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Shield Your Home’s Privacy with Screening & Hedging Plants

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Do you ever feel the need to protect the privacy of your home from unwelcome gazes? You don’t need to spend heavily on constructing a wall or a fence to prevent these stares.  Grow some fast-growing hedges which will act as a dense screen to block any unwanted attention. Additionally, colourful foliage and attractive flowers of these plants add to the visual appeal of your home.

Some of the commonly grown hedging and screening plants do not need much nurturing and grow quick and thick. You need to trim and clip these plants as per your creativity to give your home and lawn a classy and unique look.

Red Robin: The hardy shrub Red Robin, if left unpruned, can grow to a height of up to 12 feet making it a colourful screen. Pruned, these act as bright hedges with dense foliage of bright green and new red leaves.

Conifers: Another landscaper’s delight, conifers serve many purposes.  From trees that can be used to line the cobblestoned pavement, or as screens to guard privacy to round-shaped or even ground-level plants to add to the overall ambience, conifers come in many shapes and sizes. This almost evergreen, hardy plant with shapely foliage and a fragrance of its own is a gardener’s ultimate hedging and screening plant.

Japanese Box: Among the slow-growing boxwood shrubs, Japanese Box has a faster growth. Best suited for small hedging, these shrubs with glossy leaves are low on maintenance and preferred for topiary.

Orange Jasmine: This hedge shrub with its glossy leaves and aromatic flowers, though ornamental, can be grown as an effective way to create colour and fragrance.

Dwarf Lilly Pilly: An classic shrub with dense and colourful foliage and attractive flowers have edible fruits and are Ideal for hedging and topiary too.

Evergreen hedges and screens, in addition to shielding from unwelcome stares, also act  as perfect sound barriers preventing the force of howling winds and protecting against snow ( to a lesser extent.)

As per your requirement, decide the type of tree or shrub you plan to grow. Consider the availability of space while deciding on the number of rows (the more the number of rows, the denser the growth) you would like to grow.

Trees can be left alone to grow as screens. Shrubs will have to be trained after a few seasons to give the desired shape and look. Well-pruned hedges can add a charming mystery to your home.

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Creating Good Hedges In The Outdoor Garden

Hedges in our outdoor area not only add beauty to the exterior space, but also plays various roles such as improving privacy, blocking wind and reducing noise. You can make the hedges the most attractive feature of your landscape by trimming the hedges to various sizes and shapes. If you are looking to create distinct sections in your garden, you can use low hedges or box hedges. Depending on your climate, space availability, garden style, etc., you need to select the hedging plants.

Varieties of hedging plants

You can get different varieties of hedging plants from your local nursery or you can get them delivered to your place through online nurseries. Hedging plants are usually hardy and can thrive even in bad weather conditions to certain extend. You can go for evergreen shrubs like Photinia Red Robin or Christmas berry and Fringe Flower or Loropetalum China Pink to add colour to your garden almost throughout the year. If you are looking for green hedges, you can opt for Leighton Green conifer or Leyland Cypress or Sweet Viburnum. These plants are also well suited as screening hedges. Contrast coloured hedges can increase the beauty of the garden. Red Barberry with bronze-purple leaves are most suited for this purpose.

Selecting the hedge plant

You need to select attractively coloured hedge plants which are easy to maintain and are resistant to diseases and pests for your garden.  The plant should suit the climatic, soil and sunlight conditions in your garden. It is better to opt for plants which are slow growing or with moderate growth rate. You need to do frequent clipping or pruning when you opt for fast growing hedge plants. You need to consider the planting area available and the mature spread of the hedge plant to determine how many plants you will have to plant to form the hedge.

Planting the hedge

You can select the hedge plant for your garden by visiting the portfolio of online nursery. Learn about the plant and select the best one according to your need. Mark the planting area, according to the mature size of the plant. Dig the planting holes and remove the plants from the nursery pots and plant them in place. Water the plants immediately after planting and water them as needed throughout the growing season. You can add mulch between the plants to hold the water so that the roots will be able to get enough water.

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Grow Your Happiness

How growing your own edible garden will make you a happier person

Don’t worry, put your gardening gloves on and relax. It has been proven that gardening can help you feel relaxed and reduce stress levels. Growing your own edible garden will make you happier. Lets look at how gardening increases happiness.

Growing and grounding

The simple act of touching fresh earth and soil can directly impact brain health. This is known as grounding. The soil contains all these energy-boosting electrons that can be absorbed by the body helping to aid with pain relief, improve sleep patterns and enhance general mood and wellbeing. Next time your in the garden you might want to remove the gloves and get your hands dirty in the soil, see how you feel after.

Plant a seed and watch it grow

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The act of planting, growing and maintaining a crop until you have something useful to show for it is very rewarding. It is a way to grow self worth and achieve gratifying, tangible and edible evidence of our labours.

Those ambitious gardeners can even create a vegetable garden masterpiece. A well-planned and carefully maintained vegetable garden can turn a bare landscape into a colorful landscape and a thriving ecosystem.

Grow your appreciation of food

Growing food provides gardeners with an understanding and appreciation of foods and its origin. It shows us all how to live simply and as we all know, food tastes better when you pick it from your own garden. Growing your fruit and vegetables means you can be a producer and not just a consumer. Of course the added benefit is it’s more economical to grow your own food. You can enjoy having your own, customized garden full of fresh, organic produce with no added chemicals or pesticides.

Exercise

As gardeners will know, gardening provides exercise and enjoyment. It improves your mobility, endurance, strength and flexibility. Whether you’re hauling bucket loads of water or digging up carrots, your pulse will be racing faster. This means blood flow to the brain is increased and with that the body fires off a number of feel-good endorphins around the body.

When we plant, we leave the world just a bit better than the way we found it.

Here at Evergreen Growers we like to make growing your edible garden easy and affordable. Explore our Fruit & Edible section and start growing your happiness in a few clicks.

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Six things to do when putting out your tubestock plants

The beautiful Gazania Kiss Rose as tubestock. Now available!

Last week we touched on the correct way to handle your quality tubestock plants when they arrive from Evergreen Growers. This week we’d like to go into more detail about the planting out part of the process: a vital part of ensuring that your tube stock plants grow healthily and strong.

As our Garden Guide points out, care needs to be taken when planting out seedlings. Plant out on a cool, cloudy day if possible to reduce the risk of stress on the tubestock plant. Then follow the tips below to maximise chances of success. Continue reading Six things to do when putting out your tubestock plants

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Save on cost with Evergreen Growers’ bare rooted plants

Planting depth for bare rooted fruit tree.

As the wintry days begin to get cooler and shorter and the sun sinks lower in the sky, many gardeners think it a good time to take stock of the garden, put the garden tools away for the winter and wait for warmer days. Not so! The months June, July and August are the best times to get your bare rooted plants in to allow them plenty of time to establish themselves before the summer. Continue reading Save on cost with Evergreen Growers’ bare rooted plants

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Inspired by the Chelsea Flower Show winner? Try your own garden design

Winner Chelsea Flower Show. Credit RHS

Earlier this week we passed on the news on our Facebook Page of the success of the Australian design team at the prestigious Chelsea Flower Show. Trailfinders Australian Garden designer Philip Johnson and his Aussie team did their country proud by taking out the prestigious first prize. Not only were the team ecstatic at the award but the design inspired by an Australian bush gorge got the Royal Nod of Approval according to reports! Continue reading Inspired by the Chelsea Flower Show winner? Try your own garden design

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The White Mulberry — more than just a canopy tree

As part of our service to gardeners and growers (and those keen on setting up a productive and attractive garden) we at Evergreen Growers like to feature — and discuss — a selected plant available in our nursery.

This week it’s the turn of the versatile and fruit-bearing White Mulberry tree. Continue reading The White Mulberry — more than just a canopy tree

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The versatile Rosemary — for healing, flavouring and visual display

The aromatic leaves and individual taste of the rosemary plant have been highly sought after for generations as a flavouring for foods. However the versatile woody perennial herb — a member of the mint family — has been used in a number of other different ways. As well as making an ideal and hardy decorative hedge, rosemary has been venerated throughout history as a medicinal plant and in aromatherapy. Continue reading The versatile Rosemary — for healing, flavouring and visual display

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Tube stock care and planting guide

Planting young plants and watching them grow is not only good for the hip pocket, it can be a very rewarding experience and more often than not will give better results than planting more advance plants. The reason for this is that the younger plant will get a chance to acclimatise to its new environment earlier on as opposed to planting something that may have already gotten used to a totally different climate.

We’ve put together this guide is to assist in the care and planting of the tube stock plants we sell on this site. Continue reading Tube stock care and planting guide

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Planting in difficult conditions Part 1 – Clay Soils

We get a lot of questions from our customer but one of the most common type of question we get is “will this plant cope in certain conditions”. Clay\sandy soils, coastal positions, high wind, frost, dry areas and shaded positions all take their toll in varying degrees on each variety of plant. We’ve put together a series of tutorials to you show how to deal with these difficult conditions and which plants may suit a given condition. Continue reading Planting in difficult conditions Part 1 – Clay Soils